Reference Library

Here are some publications you might find useful!

Advocacy Advance

Bicycle Boulevard Planning & Design (94pp)

Bicycle Parking Guidelines APBP
(8pp)

Bike Lanes, On-Street Parking, and Business (38pp)

Cities for Cycling - NACTO Resources

A Citizens Guide to the NEPA (55pp) - A guide to the National Environmental Policy Act and Environmental Impact Statements.

Congress for New Urbanism - Project for Transportation Reform (links to several publications and presentations)

Cycling in the Netherlands (39pp)

Economic Benefits of Bicycling (13pp)

Green Lane Project - bike photos in public domain for use

Making Walking and Cycling Safer: Lessons from Europe (33pp)

Michelle Obama Childhood Obesity Report (124pp)

MUTCD (new 2009 edition)

The National Bicycling and Walking Study: 15–Year Status Report (24pp)

Neighborhood Navigators K-8 Course

Oregon Bicyclist Manual (16pp)

Oregon State Bike Map

Pedal Power: A Legal Guide for Oregon Bicyclists (200pp pdf) and articles about Oregon bike law. Ray Thomas and Swanson, Thomas & Coon have a robust set of legal resources for people who bike.

Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety and Mobility in Europe (80pp)

Rivercrossing Alternate Modes Study (91pp)

Salem-Keizer Bike Maps, including a KML file for google earth (revised 2012)

Urban Bikeway Design Guide (NACTO)

Walking - Tom Vanderbilt's 4 Part Series on the Crisis in Walking

And an amazing set of before/after images of road diets and improved public spaces in New York City

An article, "America's Cities Are Still Too Afraid to Make Driving Unappealing" on why the carrots-alone approach won't work without also some stick.

The story of the crazy success and popularity of BC's carbon tax in The Atlantic.

Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (June 2014)

Vox has a great series "Biking in the 21st Century" and a stand-alone piece on "Building New Roads just Makes People Drive More." They also joined the bandwagon on the history of jaywalking! Also the general series on "transportation."

The Center for Disease Control says that for every person killed in a car crash, 8 are hospitalized, and 100 are treated in the emergency room. So if more than 30,000 a year are killed in car crashes, 2.5 million have to go to the emergency room each year. The costs are high.

AARP on Livability: Fact sheets on density, walking and biking, road diets, form-based code...very interesting!

Fivethirtyeight on "Why the Rules of the Road aren't Enough to Prevent People from Dying"

The Victoria Transport Policy Institute and LSE Cities:  Analysis of Public Policies That Unintentionally Encourage and Subsidize Urban Sprawl. Here's Vox with commentary: "Suburban sprawl is stifling the US economy."